“I’m Gay, for You”: The Status of Queerness as Identity and Attraction to Transgender People

When discussing queerness in relation to loving or being attracted to transgender people, several realities must be acknowledged as to the lived realities of transgender people. The first prominent point, and perhaps the most important for any discussion regarding transgender identities, is that transgender people as a group are composed of a wide variety of identities and physiologies. Even when the element of individual human variability is ignored, transition is not a straightforward shot towards an idealized, binary body. Instead, it should be the practice of an individual reclaiming ownership of their own body, modifying elements of that body in … Continue reading “I’m Gay, for You”: The Status of Queerness as Identity and Attraction to Transgender People

Transitioning as Body Modification: An Argument Against Medical Gatekeeping

Medical gatekeeping – the practice of denying medical treatment to individuals based on a set of criteria that differs based on their ascribed identities – is a practice that physically transitioning transgender individuals are far too familiar with. Although the … Continue reading Transitioning as Body Modification: An Argument Against Medical Gatekeeping

Even The FBI Doesn’t Think She’s Asking For It: How Criminal Profiling Disproves the Myth of the Perfect Victim

The concept of women asking for assault – whether that assault be anything ranging from verbal assault to rape and murder – is a common trope perpetuated by both the media and cultural lore. As a result of this trope, … Continue reading Even The FBI Doesn’t Think She’s Asking For It: How Criminal Profiling Disproves the Myth of the Perfect Victim

Feminine v. Masculine Power Dynamics: Red Pill Disagrees, But a Good Leader Uses Both

Featured image is “Leadership,” by Kevin Dooley

In The Red Pill Constitution proposed by Illimitable Men, there is a distinction between feminine and masculine powers – the feminine being soft power, and the masculine being hard power. Soft power, according to the author, refers to things such as “influence and charm” used to gain power and hard power refers to “economic and political” power.

Feminists crave privileges which consolidate the realm of male power with that of the female. … This is achieved by glossing over the influence of feminine soft power in society (influence and charm), and comparing men and women solely in hard power (economic and political). In taking this highly one-sided approach to power, feminists play upon humanity’s propensity to take pity on women, and where the myth of female powerlessness is bought into, more power is redistributed to them.

… All the while women continue to quietly monopolise soft power. Because social influence (the female monopoly on pity as well as beauty) is difficult to quantify, its prominence is neither stated nor factored into measures of equality.

Hard power and soft power in reference to leadership and power have been talked about before, except they’re not exclusive to men and women – good leaders of all genders use both.

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Cowardice and Privilege: Some Thoughts on Roosh V

“A gang is where a coward goes to hide.” – Mickey Mantle

There have been many criticisms of the bulk body of feminism (or, rather, the second and third wave feminisms in which people are most familiar with) by people who identify as men, claiming that advocation of “safe spaces” (or, rather, the strawman concept that most people think is a safe space) or even feminism as a whole coddles women and other marginalized groups.

But in all reality, those arguments are spouted from a nest of settled, longstanding privilege. When examined closely, the demands of marginalized groups for safe spaces and respect come from a position of long endured abuse and struggle, and often those who are privileged who encounter even the slightest opposition are quick to return to the safe spaces that have been established for them and that they refuse to recognize.

Whether or not you agree with various forms of discourse, it is unquestionable that marginalized groups do suffer and tolerate backlash better than non-marginalized groups. Whether that group is demarcated by race, gender, sexuality, or class, privileged individuals have a nasty habit of advocating violence while being unable to handle violence directed at them.

Continue reading “Cowardice and Privilege: Some Thoughts on Roosh V”