The 2011 Sweden Study on Transgender Criminality is Flawed for More Reasons Than You’d Think

Articles have been written before about the 2011 study on transgender criminality which seems to “prove” that transgender women are just as prone to sexual assault as cisgender men. One of the researchers, Dr. Ceclia Dhejene, has already responded to those claims and stated that the research actually shows that health care for transgender people has actually gotten better over time and that there was no causal link between “male criminality” and transgender women.

However, the article that contains that interview, while comprehensive and informative, ignores one major factor. The study itself only considered the variable of whether or not the transgender person had SRS as a measure of transition, which leads to a whole bunch of new variables.

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Even The FBI Doesn’t Think She’s Asking For It: How Criminal Profiling Disproves the Myth of the Perfect Victim

The concept of women asking for assault – whether that assault be anything ranging from verbal assault to rape and murder – is a common trope perpetuated by both the media and cultural lore. As a result of this trope, … Continue reading Even The FBI Doesn’t Think She’s Asking For It: How Criminal Profiling Disproves the Myth of the Perfect Victim

Feminine v. Masculine Power Dynamics: Red Pill Disagrees, But a Good Leader Uses Both

Featured image is “Leadership,” by Kevin Dooley

In The Red Pill Constitution proposed by Illimitable Men, there is a distinction between feminine and masculine powers – the feminine being soft power, and the masculine being hard power. Soft power, according to the author, refers to things such as “influence and charm” used to gain power and hard power refers to “economic and political” power.

Feminists crave privileges which consolidate the realm of male power with that of the female. … This is achieved by glossing over the influence of feminine soft power in society (influence and charm), and comparing men and women solely in hard power (economic and political). In taking this highly one-sided approach to power, feminists play upon humanity’s propensity to take pity on women, and where the myth of female powerlessness is bought into, more power is redistributed to them.

… All the while women continue to quietly monopolise soft power. Because social influence (the female monopoly on pity as well as beauty) is difficult to quantify, its prominence is neither stated nor factored into measures of equality.

Hard power and soft power in reference to leadership and power have been talked about before, except they’re not exclusive to men and women – good leaders of all genders use both.

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Cowardice and Privilege: Some Thoughts on Roosh V

“A gang is where a coward goes to hide.” – Mickey Mantle

There have been many criticisms of the bulk body of feminism (or, rather, the second and third wave feminisms in which people are most familiar with) by people who identify as men, claiming that advocation of “safe spaces” (or, rather, the strawman concept that most people think is a safe space) or even feminism as a whole coddles women and other marginalized groups.

But in all reality, those arguments are spouted from a nest of settled, longstanding privilege. When examined closely, the demands of marginalized groups for safe spaces and respect come from a position of long endured abuse and struggle, and often those who are privileged who encounter even the slightest opposition are quick to return to the safe spaces that have been established for them and that they refuse to recognize.

Whether or not you agree with various forms of discourse, it is unquestionable that marginalized groups do suffer and tolerate backlash better than non-marginalized groups. Whether that group is demarcated by race, gender, sexuality, or class, privileged individuals have a nasty habit of advocating violence while being unable to handle violence directed at them.

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Gloria Steinem’s Statements are a Perfect Example of “White Feminism” Surrounding Hillary Clinton

Featured image pulled from Gloria Steinem’s official website.

Women are more for [Clinton] than men are. Men tend to get more conservative because they gain power as they age, women get more radical because they lose power as they age.

They’re going to get more activist as they grow older. And when you’re younger, you think: ‘Where are the boys? The boys are with Bernie.’

Obviously, this quote has been rehashed over and over in the past few days, mostly pointing out how it’s sexist and extremely misogynistic to accuse younger women of voting based on attracting men. (Which, can we stop for a moment and consider how odd of a concept this is? They don’t know who you’re voting for. Nobody really does.)

Madeline Albright was even worse, being quoted as saying that there’s a “special place in hell for women who don’t help other women,” as if they should vote for Hillary Clinton just based on the fact that she identifies as a woman.

Supporters have gone back and forth on social media, with feminist groups responding that they’re #NotHereForBoys and Bernie Sanders posting pictures of the women leading his campaign.

But is Hillary Clinton a feminist that really cares about the issues of all women, or is she a “white feminist” – an adjective here that doesn’t refer to her race, but to the fact that her brand of feminism caters to the white, straight, Christian, able-bodied upper class? I would argue that she is, and it’s unfortunately not a difficult argument to make given the advent of social media and how her campaign has been using it.

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